Questions About ADHD

About ADHD.

ADHD stands for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, a neurodevelopmental disorder that affects both children and adults. ADHD is typically characterised by symptoms such as difficulty with focus, hyperactivity, impulsivity, and organisation.

Individuals with ADHD may have trouble completing tasks, sitting still, and paying attention, which can negatively impact their academic, social, and professional lives. Fortunately, with proper diagnosis and treatment, individuals with ADHD can learn to manage their symptoms and lead fulfilling lives.

I have furnished below some questions I often get asked by my clients.

Frequently Asked Questions.

What are the symptoms of ADHD?

Symptoms of ADHD can vary from person to person but may include difficulty focusing or paying attention, being easily distracted, forgetfulness, hyperactivity, impulsivity, and difficulty with the organisation or completing of tasks. If you are concerned that you or a loved one may have ADHD, it is important to consult with a medical professional for an accurate diagnosis.

How is ADHD diagnosed?

ADHD is typically diagnosed through a comprehensive evaluation that may include a physical exam, neurological exam, psychological assessment, and review of symptoms. A medical professional, such as a psychiatrist or neurologist, may also consider factors such as medical history, family history, and academic or work performance.

What are some treatments for ADHD?

Treatment for ADHD typically involves a combination of medication, therapy, and lifestyle changes. Medications such as stimulants may be prescribed to help manage symptoms such as hyperactivity and impulsivity. Therapy, such as cognitive-behavioural therapy, can help individuals with ADHD develop coping strategies for managing their symptoms. Lifestyle changes such as regular exercise, healthy eating habits, and a structured routine can also be beneficial in managing ADHD symptoms.

Does ADHD only affect children?

No, ADHD can affect both children and adults. While ADHD is often diagnosed in childhood, many individuals may not receive a diagnosis until later in life. Symptoms of ADHD can persist into adulthood and can have a significant impact on academic, social, and professional functioning.

What services does Partridge ADHD Clinic offer?

Partridge ADHD Clinic specialises in child and adult ADHD assessment and treatment in Oxford.

Is ADHD overdiagnosed?

While there is some debate about the prevalence of ADHD diagnoses, most experts agree that ADHD is underdiagnosed in some groups, such as girls and adults. To receive a diagnosis of ADHD, a comprehensive evaluation is typically required, which includes multiple sources of information and an evaluation of multiple symptoms.

Can diet affect ADHD symptoms?

While there is some evidence to suggest that certain diets, such as the Mediterranean diet, may be beneficial for individuals with ADHD, there is no conclusive evidence that any specific diet can cure or eliminate ADHD symptoms. However, a healthy diet and regular exercise can be beneficial in managing ADHD symptoms and improving overall health.

Can ADHD be outgrown?

While some children may experience a reduction in ADHD symptoms as they enter adolescence or adulthood, ADHD is a chronic condition that can persist throughout a person’s life. However, with proper treatment and management, individuals with ADHD can learn to effectively manage their symptoms and lead successful and fulfilling lives.

Can adults be diagnosed with ADHD?

Yes, adults can be diagnosed with ADHD. In fact, it is estimated that up to 5% of adults may have ADHD. The symptoms of ADHD can present differently in adults than in children, which can make diagnosis more challenging. However, with proper evaluation and diagnosis, adults with ADHD can benefit from treatment and support.

What is the difference between ADHD and ADD?

ADD (Attention Deficit Disorder) is an outdated term that was used to describe individuals who primarily had symptoms of inattention, but not hyperactivity. Today, ADHD is the preferred term, and there are three subtypes: predominantly inattentive type, predominantly hyperactive-impulsive type, and combined type, which includes both inattentive and hyperactive-impulsive symptoms.

Will I be fast-tracked to CAMHS or Adult NHS Services if I have a private diagnosis?

No. Having a diagnosis of ADHD and starting treatment does not fast-track someone to NHS services.

What is an Independent Prescriber?

An Independent Prescriber is a clinician who has undertaken further training and gained a qualification (usually a V300) in order to take responsibility to assess people with undiagnosed conditions and then make prescribing decisions to treat a clinical condition. The public can check a nurse and independent prescriber is registered by searching the Nursing and Midwifery Councils register online.

What is shared Care?

‘Shared Care’ is an agreement between a GP, patient and specialist. It enables the care and treatment to be shared and most commonly for people with ADHD this will mean that when a condition is ‘stable’ i.e. when ADHD medication has been optimized, your GP will agree to offer repeat prescriptions as long as a specialist continues to routinely review the patient. Some GPs agree to take over the care of Adult ADHD entirely with annual reviews once the treatment is stable. For children, they will need reviews every 6 months by a specialist.

Can I ask Partridge ADHD Clinic to prescribe if I already have a diagnosis?

Yes. The primary reason I have set up this service is to help reduce wait times to ADHD treatment. I will need a copy of the diagnostic report.

Can I request an assessment and treatment without my GP knowing?

No. I operate a full disclosure policy from and to the GP. This is to manage and share risk and to reduce medication mis-management.

I hope this FAQ page helps provide an overview of ADHD and the services offered by Partridge ADHD Clinic. Let me know if you have any additional questions or if there is anything else I can assist you with. I’m Gavin Partridge and you can call me on 07921 002 670 or email me at

Understanding ADHD.

ADHD is thought to be caused by a combination of genetic, environmental, and neurological factors. Research suggests that individuals with ADHD may have differences in the structure and function of certain parts of the brain that are involved in attention, motivation, and impulse control.

There are three subtypes of ADHD: predominantly inattentive type, predominantly hyperactive-impulsive type, and combined type. The subtype a person has depends on which symptoms are most prominent.

While medication and therapy can be effective in managing ADHD symptoms, there is no cure for ADHD. However, with proper treatment and support, individuals with ADHD can lead successful and fulfilling lives.

It’s important to note that having ADHD does not mean someone is unintelligent or lazy. In fact, many individuals with ADHD are highly creative, intelligent, and successful in their chosen fields.

Lastly, it’s worth mentioning that there are many myths and misconceptions about ADHD. For example, some people believe that ADHD is caused by poor parenting or too much screen time. These beliefs are not supported by research and can be harmful to individuals with ADHD and their families. It’s important to rely on accurate information and seek support from qualified medical professionals when dealing with ADHD.

myths and misconceptions about ADHD.

  1. Myth: ADHD is just an excuse for bad behaviour.
    Fact: ADHD is a real medical condition that affects the way the brain functions. While individuals with ADHD may struggle with impulsive or hyperactive behaviour, these behaviours are not intentional and can be managed with proper treatment and support.
  2. Myth: ADHD only affects children.
    Fact: While ADHD is often diagnosed in childhood, it can persist into adulthood. In fact, up to 60% of children with ADHD will continue to experience symptoms into adulthood.
  3. Myth: ADHD is caused by poor parenting or too much screen time.
    Fact: ADHD is a complex condition that is thought to be caused by a combination of genetic, environmental, and neurological factors. Parenting style and screen time may exacerbate symptoms, but they do not cause ADHD.
  4. Myth: ADHD is just a lack of discipline or willpower.
    Fact: ADHD is not a character flaw or a lack of willpower. It is a neurodevelopmental disorder that affects the way the brain functions.
  5. Myth: Medication is the only treatment for ADHD.
    Fact: While medication can be an effective treatment for ADHD, it is not the only option. Behavioural therapy, such as cognitive-behavioural therapy or behavioural parent training, can also be helpful in managing ADHD symptoms.
  6. Myth: Everyone has a little bit of ADHD.
    Fact: While many people may experience occasional symptoms of distractibility or forgetfulness, ADHD is a chronic condition that significantly affects daily functioning and quality of life.

It’s important to rely on accurate information and seek support from qualified medical professionals when dealing with ADHD.